Mormon History 1830-1844

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Debating School Incident, 1835–1836
In 1835, William Smith sponsors a "debating school" in house where he and his parents live. On Saturday evening, December 12, Joseph records in his journal that he took the affirmative on the question, "Was it necessary for God to reveal himself to man, in order for their happiness." But he is called away to see Angeline Works, who was reportedly "dangerously sick."
The debate continues on Wednesday, December 16, and at the conclusion a dispute arises over whether the school should be continued. Joseph is of the mind that it should not. William attacks him physically. The next day, William, an apostle, is admonished by the rest of the Twelve to make amends. He sends Joseph a three-page apology §, begging to be released from his apostleship without losing his church membership. In a seven-page reply §, Joseph forgives William but admonishes him to control his temper. He thinks it will not help William to be relieved of his apostleship, and as for his membership, that will be up to the church. Later, their parents call on Joseph § and he persuades them to move out of William's house into his.

In the meantime, seventy Almon Babbitt has been blaming Joseph for the incident, asserting he can't handle being bested in an argument. Joseph files a complaint with the high council § against Almon for "traducing his character." In the end, Almon makes an apology § that is accepted by most of the council, but which does not satisfy the prophet.

Finally, Joseph and William meet with Hyrum, Joseph Sr., Uncle John Smith, Martin Harris. Joseph Sr. expresses his sorrow over the rift, all enmity is dissolved, the two brothers forgive each other, and covenant to build one another up and never listen to rumors about each other but deal with one another directly.
This is one of the best documented episodes of the Kirtland period. It illustrates both church and Smith family dynamics from multiple, contemporaneous sources.
Joseph's journal entries, December 16–18, 1835
Joseph attends debate

Propriety of continuing the school
[December 16, 1835] This evening according to adjournment I went to Br. Wm. Smiths, to take part in the debate that was commenced on Saturday evening last.—after the debate was concluded, and a desision given in favour of the affirmative of the question, some altercation took place, upon the improp[r]iety of continueing the School fearing that it would not result in good.  
Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.
')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2, 69–70.

"… to take part in the debate, that was commenced on last Saturday evening, upon the question before named, viz. was it necessary for God to reveal himself to the world &c."
1834&#45;1836 history in JS &#34;large journal&#34; labeled A&#45;1 &#40;1&#45;194 numbered from the front of the book&#41;. Contents: Genealogy of Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery; blank pages for Sidney Rigdon and Frederick G. Williams genealogy; transcript of Oliver Cowdery&#39;s history of the church published in the <i>Messenger and Advocate</i> &#40;1834&#45;1835&#41; &#40;Frederick G. Williams hand&#41;; journal&#45;type entries for September 22, 1834 to January 11, 1836 in third person &#40;mostly Warren Parrish hand&#41;. Writing began October 29, 1835 and ended January 17, 1836. <i>Selected Collections</i> 1:1 // <i>Papers of Joseph Smith</i> 1:15&#45;209 . Original, Church Archives, CR 100 102, Volume 1.
')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">1834¢1836 history, 149.

"[Joseph] and his brother Hyrum Smith were descidedly of the opinion that it [continuing the school] would not result in good."
1834&#45;1836 history in JS &#34;large journal&#34; labeled A&#45;1 &#40;1&#45;194 numbered from the front of the book&#41;. Contents: Genealogy of Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery; blank pages for Sidney Rigdon and Frederick G. Williams genealogy; transcript of Oliver Cowdery&#39;s history of the church published in the <i>Messenger and Advocate</i> &#40;1834&#45;1835&#41; &#40;Frederick G. Williams hand&#41;; journal&#45;type entries for September 22, 1834 to January 11, 1836 in third person &#40;mostly Warren Parrish hand&#41;. Writing began October 29, 1835 and ended January 17, 1836. <i>Selected Collections</i> 1:1 // <i>Papers of Joseph Smith</i> 1:15&#45;209 . Original, Church Archives, CR 100 102, Volume 1.
')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">1834¢1836 history, 150. William assaults Joseph, Jared Carter, others

Joseph grieved, prays for William
Br. Wm opposed these measures and insisted on having another question proposed, and at length become much enraged particularly at me and used [70] violence upon my person, and also upon J. Carter and some others, for which I am grieved beyond expression, and can only pray God to forgive him inasmuch as he repents of his wickedness, and humbles himself before the Lord.   "… violence upon his person, and others who interfered to stay him … Joseph, returned home, grieved beyond expression, at <the> wickedness of his brother, who Cain like had sought to kill him, and had conciderably wounded him " 1834&#45;1836 history in JS &#34;large journal&#34; labeled A&#45;1 &#40;1&#45;194 numbered from the front of the book&#41;. Contents: Genealogy of Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery; blank pages for Sidney Rigdon and Frederick G. Williams genealogy; transcript of Oliver Cowdery&#39;s history of the church published in the <i>Messenger and Advocate</i> &#40;1834&#45;1835&#41; &#40;Frederick G. Williams hand&#41;; journal&#45;type entries for September 22, 1834 to January 11, 1836 in third person &#40;mostly Warren Parrish hand&#41;. Writing began October 29, 1835 and ended January 17, 1836. <i>Selected Collections</i> 1:1 // <i>Papers of Joseph Smith</i> 1:15&#45;209 . Original, Church Archives, CR 100 102, Volume 1.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">1834¢1836 history, 150.    
        December 17, 1835 after addressing Orson Hyde's complaint that William Smith has received preferential treatment at the store, Joseph journalizes:   Orson Hyde's 1835 Complaint Parents upset, call on Joseph

Joseph blameless
My Father & Mother called this evening to see me upon the subject of the difficulty, that transpired at their house on wednesd[a]y evening between me and my Br. William. they were sorely affected in mind on the account of that occurrence. I conversed with them, and showed convinced them that I was not to blame in taking the course I did, but had acted in righteousness, in all thing[s] on that occasion   Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2, 75.

occurrence: recurrence, 1834&#45;1836 history in JS &#34;large journal&#34; labeled A&#45;1 &#40;1&#45;194 numbered from the front of the book&#41;. Contents: Genealogy of Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery; blank pages for Sidney Rigdon and Frederick G. Williams genealogy; transcript of Oliver Cowdery&#39;s history of the church published in the <i>Messenger and Advocate</i> &#40;1834&#45;1835&#41; &#40;Frederick G. Williams hand&#41;; journal&#45;type entries for September 22, 1834 to January 11, 1836 in third person &#40;mostly Warren Parrish hand&#41;. Writing began October 29, 1835 and ended January 17, 1836. <i>Selected Collections</i> 1:1 // <i>Papers of Joseph Smith</i> 1:15&#45;209 . Original, Church Archives, CR 100 102, Volume 1.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">1834¢1836 history, 154.    
    William apologizes to Hyrum

Hyrum agrees with Joseph
  December 18, 1835 Hyrum reads Joseph a letter from William asking forgiveness for "the abuse he offered to him, at the debate." They discuss the difficulty between Joseph and William most of the morning. Hyrum is "perfectly satisfied" with Joseph's course, but   Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2, 76. Hyrum sympathizes with William   he is wounded to the verry Soul, with<because of> the conduct of William, and although he feels the tender feelings of a brother toward him yet he can but look upon his conduct as an abomination in the sight of God.        
        William's apology   William and Joseph Smith's Apologies, 1835 compares both versions of William's letter     Later in the day, Joseph receives William's apology, dated December 18:   William contrite   William, fearful that he has "forfeited all right and title to the word brother, in consequence of what I have done … after coming to myself, and concidering upon what I have done," recognizes it his his responsibility "to make a humble confession to you for what I have done or what took place the other evening."     Twelve called William to account, disgraced

Sick

Ready to give up apostleship
  The Twelve called him on the carpet yesterday, and he told them that in view of "the many difficulties that I had had with the church and the much disgrace I had brought upon my Self," and that his health would prevent him from attending school to prepare for the endowment and from traveling, perhaps it would be better for them to appoint someone else to take his place in the quorum.     Danger of falling from high position


Passions may make it worse later
  This way, when he falls into temptation, he would not "bring so much disgrace upon the cause. … you know my passions and the danger of falling from so high a Station, and thus by withdrawing from the office of the apostleship, while there is Salvation for me, and remaining a member of the church; I feel a fraid if I do'nt do this it will be worse for me, Some other day."   "For of him unto whom much is given much is required; and he who sins against the greater light shall receive the greater condemnation." ¶ D&C 82:3 (Apr. 26, 1832) Begs to retain membership

Will make amends
  "Do not think that I am your enemy" he pleads, "I must confess that I do not know what I have been doing about—I feel sorry for what I have done and humbly ask your forgiveness … I feel as though all the confessions that I could make verbally or by writing would not be sufficient to atone for the transgression—be this as it may I am willing to make all the restitution you Shall require, If I can stay in the church as a member—I will try to make all the Satisfaction possible—"        
        Joseph's reply, December 19   ¶ William and Joseph Smith's Apologies, 1835 contains both versions of Joseph's letter. Joseph's reply

Pleased with William's debating school idea
  Joseph replies on the 19th that he was "delighted" with the idea of William's debating school, and when he went last Wednesday night, it was "not with the idea of breaking up the School, neither did it enter into my heart that there was any wrangling or jealousy's in your heart against me." But before he left home,   Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2, 80–87. Negative feelings before attending   there were feelings of solemnity, rolling across my breast, which were unaccountable to me, and also these feelings continued by spells to depress my feelings <Spirit> and seemed to manifest that all was not right …     Pleased with arguments   I was pleased with the power of the arguments, that were aduced, and did [81] not feel to cast any reflections, upon any one that had spoken …     Duty to reprove   But he felt those who presided should have been more sober "when folly and that which militates against truth and righteousness" was expressed. So in the spirit of his calling, he considered it his duty "to reprove whatever I esteemed to be wrong fondly hoping in my heart that all parties, would consider it right, and therefore humble themselves, that satan might not take the advantage of us, and hinder the progress of our School."     Shouldn't have interrupted McLellin   In particular, he felt "grieved at the interuption you made upon Elder McLellin. I thought, you should have considered your situation, with him, in your apostle ship, and not manifest any division of sentiment, between you, and him, for a surrounding multitude to take the advantage of you."     Hyrum asks to speak

William defensive
  Then, when the debate was over, and Hyrum requested permission to speak, William said he could "if he would not abuse the school" and that "you would not allow any man to abuse the school in your house."     Joseph mortified, tries to intervene

William as ugly as devil
Now you had no reason to suspect that Hyrum, would abuse the School, therefore my feelings were mortifyed, at these unnecessary observations. I undertook to reason, with you but you manifisted, an inconsiderate and stubborn spirit, I then despared of benefiting you, on account of the spirit you manifested, which dr[e]w from me, the expression that you was as ugly as the Devil.     Joseph Sr. commands silence

William refuses
  Father then commanded silence, and I formed a determination to obey his mandate, and was about to leave the house … [but] you replyed that you, would say what you pleased in your own house. Father replyed, say what you please, but let the rest hold their, tongues …     Joseph Sr. urges others to be still

Joseph Jr. helped build the house

Joseph's birthright to reprove younger brother
  Immediately Joseph thought of all he had done for William and his family, finishing his house, providing flour, etc. Besides, it was Joseph Sr.'s house as well, and Joseph Jr. had a right to speak in his father's house. Furthermore, it was Joseph's birthright to reprove his younger brothers.     Joseph declares his right to speak   therefore I said I will speak, for I built the house, and it is as much mine as yours, or something, to that effect. (I should have said that I helped to finish the house,) …   Ignores Joseph Sr.'s command? William assaults Joseph   At this, William came after Joseph, who started to take off his coat, but William was too quick. It took others to pull him off. An old wound in Joseph's side was re-injured, making it impossible for him to stand or sit without assistance.     Forgives, but …   William has "asked my forgivness, which I readily grant," but he suspects that William still harbors some resentment. Joseph assures him that whatever he said was motivated by his desire to save William from "falling into difficulties, and sorrows which I foresaw you plunging into, by giving way to that wicked spirit, which you call your passions, which you should curb and break down, and put under your feet; which if you do not you, never can be saved, in my view, in the kingdom of God."     Forsaking apostleship a bad idea

  The idea of William forsaking his apostleship is "a stratagem of the evil one." Instead, William needs to rise up and overcome his passions "and please God … forsaking your apostleship, is not to be willing, to make that sacrafice that God requires at your hands and is to incur his displeasure, and without pleasing God, do not think, that it will be any better for you."     Joseph brought salvation to family

Duty to admonish
  Joseph reminds William, "I brought salvation to my father's house, as an instrument in the hand of God, when they were in a miserable situation, You know that it is my duty to admonish you when you do wrong this liberty I shall always take, and you shall have the same privilege, I take the privilege, to admonish you, because of my birthright, and I grant you the privilege because it is my duty, to be humble and receive rebuke, and instruction, from a brother, or a friend."     Clear of William's sins As it regards, what course you shall persue hereafter, I do not pretend to say, I leave you in the hands of God and his church. make your own desision. I will do you good, altho you mar me, or slay me, by so doing my garments, shall be clear of your sins,     If you think me an imposter

Leave me in God's hands
  and if at any time you should concider me to be an imposter, for heavens Sake leave me in the hands of God, and not think to take vengance on me your self.     Not a tyrant   Joseph is not a tyrant; he has never wanted to take away men's rights.     Prayer for mercy, blessings, etc.   He prays, " may God have mercy upon my fathers house, may God take away enmity, from betwe[e]n me and thee, and may all blessings be restored, and the past be forgotten forever, may humble repentance bring us both to thee <O God> and to thy power and protection, and a crown, to enjoy the society of father mother Alvin Hyrum Sophron[i]a Samuel Catharine Carloss Lucy the Saints and all the sanctified in peace forever."        
        Joseph's journal entries, December 19–23, 1835     Joseph writes William, prays for him   [December 19, 1835 Joseph writes the above letter.] I have had many Sollum <Solemn> feelings this day Concerning my Brothe[r] William and have prayed in my heart to fervently that the Lord will not him<cast him> off but <he> may return to the God of Jacob and magnify his apostleship and calling may this be his happy lot for the Lord of Glorys Sake Amen   Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2, 87. The quoted portion of this entry, and the entries for Dec. 20, 21, and 22 are in Joseph's hand. On the 22nd he notes, "my scribe also is unwell O my God heal him and for his kindness to me O my Soul be thou greatful to him and bles him …< for I believe him to be a faithful friend to me therefore my Soul delighteth in him Amen / Joseph Smith Jr" Stays home Sunday [Sunday, December 20, 1835] At home all day and took Solled Comfort with my family had many Serious reflections Brother Palmer and Tailor [Taylor] Came to see me I showed them the sacred record to their Joy and satisfaction …       December 21, 1835 Joseph spends the day at home studying.   Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2, 88.     December 22, 1835 Joseph spends the day at home studying Hebrew. Addresses the church in the evening.   Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2     December 23, 1835 Joseph spends the day at home studying Greek.   Entries from here to Jan. 16, 1836 are in the hand of Frederick G. Williams.    
        Almon Babbitt trial, December 28, 1835     Joseph's complaint against Almon Babbit

"Traducing my character"
  December 28, 1835 Joseph submits a complaint to the high council against Almon Babbit for "traducing my character." Almon maintains that Joseph "got mad [at the debate] because he was overpowered in argument" and "it had not been for J. Smith getting mad there would have been no difficulty."   Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2

¶ Minutes of December 28, 1835
Lyman Wight   Lyman Wight (h) (swh) testifies of what he heard Almon say: that "J. Smith Junr. got mad because he got overpowered in argumint," that "a man must be a very weak man if he could not argue aginst the truth without being swerved," and that "there would have been no disturbance if he had not got mad."     Elder Orton   Elder Orton heard the same statements and adds that Almon "appeared dissatisfied with J. Smiths bad spirit."     Lyman Sherman   Lyman Sherman heard Almon say "we would not have had any difficulty, if J. Smith had not have got mad."     Brigham Young   According to Brigham Young, "Babbitt said Smith would not have wanted the school broke up, if they had not got defeated."     Thomas Paine dangerous?   Elder Orton, Brigham Young, and Orson Hyde heard either Almon Babbitt or "Bishop" say, "he could read Tho. Paine or any other work without being swerved" or anyone who could be "swerved when debating questions, must be weak minded," or Thomas Paine could be read "without having his faith shaken."   Bishop: possibly Francis Gladden Bishop, presiding elder of the Westfield, New York, branch.

The Smith family has a history with Paine's Age of Reason. Did Joseph cite it as a subversive book that should not be read?
Verdict   Ultimately, Sidney Rigdon decides that Almon shall publicly confess that he "let the adversary get the possession of his heart … has spoken things falsely to the injury of J. Smith Junr., and by injuring him he has insulted the feelings of the church of Christ."   Almon confesses   Almon admits "that he was to blame, for speaking about Brother Smith as he did … but is not willing to confess that he lied."     Majority accept confession   Upon reconsideration, the council decides that Almon has "done wrong." Almon agrees and his statement is accepted by "most of the brethren present."     Joseph dissatisfied   [Joseph journalizes:] I attended, with my witnesses, and substantiated my charge against him and he in part acknowledged his fault, but not Satisfactory to the council, and after parlying with him a long time, and granting him every indulgence, that righteousness require the council adjourned without obtaining a full confession from him   Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2, 91.

Did Joseph make his dissatisfaction known at the meeting and the majority ruled, in effect, against him?
   
        William Smith charged     Complaint against William

Parents live with Joseph and Emma
  The day after Almon's trial, high counselor Orson Johnson submits a complaint to the council charging William with (1) "Unchristian like conduct in speaking disrespectfully of President Joseph Smith Junr. and the revelations & commandments given through him;" and (2) "attempting to inflict personal violence on President J. Smith Junr." By this time, Joseph Sr. and Lucy Mack have moved into Joseph Jr.'s home.   Orson Johnson's Charge Against William Smith

Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2, 92.
   
        Joseph meets with Twelve     Twelve confer with Joseph   [December 31, 1835] the 12. convened in the <upper> room in the printing office directly over the room wher[e] we were convened, in our studies, they sent for me and the presidency, (or part of them,) to receive council from us on the subject of the council, which is to be held on Saturday next   Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2, 93.    
        Meeting of the Smith men         Joseph's Diary (Oliver Cowdery) 1834–1836 History (Warren Parrish)   Warren Cowdery wrote the first account in third person. Warren later copied it into Joseph's 1834– 1836 history in third person.
Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2, 94–95. 1834&#45;1836 history in JS &#34;large journal&#34; labeled A&#45;1 &#40;1&#45;194 numbered from the front of the book&#41;. Contents: Genealogy of Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery; blank pages for Sidney Rigdon and Frederick G. Williams genealogy; transcript of Oliver Cowdery&#39;s history of the church published in the <i>Messenger and Advocate</i> &#40;1834&#45;1835&#41; &#40;Frederick G. Williams hand&#41;; journal&#45;type entries for September 22, 1834 to January 11, 1836 in third person &#40;mostly Warren Parrish hand&#41;. Writing began October 29, 1835 and ended January 17, 1836. <i>Selected Collections</i> 1:1 // <i>Papers of Joseph Smith</i> 1:15&#45;209 . Original, Church Archives, CR 100 102, Volume 1.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">1834¢1836 history, 166–168 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., compiled and edited by Dean C. Jessee &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 2002&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">PWJS, 149–150 Dust and ashes

Friday morning Jany 1st 1836 this being the beginning of a new year, my heart is filled with gratitude to God, that he has preserved my life and the lives of my family while another year has rolled away, we have been, sustained and upheld in the midst of a wicked and perverse generation, and exposed to all, the afflictions temptations, and misery that are incident to human life, for which I feel to humble myself in dust and ashes, as it were before the Lord.—

Friday morning January 1st 1836.—on the introduction of the new year, his heart is filled with greatful praise to God, for his kind care that has been over him and his family in preserving their lives while ann other year has rolled away. They have been sustained and upheld in the midst of a wicked and pervers generation and exposed to all the afflictions temptations and miseries that are incident to human life; for which [167] he felt to humble himself, as it were in dust and ashes before the Lord.—

  Dispute affects brothers, sisters   but notwithstanding, the gratitude that fills my heart on retrospecting the past year, and the multiplyed blessings that have crowned our heads, my heart is pained within me because of the difficulty that exists in my fathers family, But notwithstanding the gratitude that filled his heart, on retrospecting the past year, with the multiplied blessings that have crowned his head; his heart is pained, and his peace disturbed, when he reflects upon the difficulties that exists in his fathers family       the Devil has made a violent attack on Br. Wm and Br Calvin and the powers of darkness, seeme lower over their minds and not only theirs but cast a gloomy shade over the minds of my my parents and some of my brothers and sisters. which prevents them from seeing things as they realy are. The Devil has