Mormon History 1830-1844

Frederick G. Williams (1787–1842)
Joseph's scribe, counselor in the First Presidency, physician.
Born Frederick Granger Williams, October 28, 1787, in Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, the oldest of five children. ¶ Ancestry.com (subscribers)
Died October 10, 1842 in Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois ¶ Ancestry.com
Father William Wheeler Williams
Mother Ruth Granger
Hiram 1799 W. W. Williams builds what is reported as the first cabin and make a clearing in what becomes Hiram, Trumbull (Portage) County, but soon moves to Cuyahoga County.

<i>History of Portage County, Ohio</i> &#40;Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1885; rev. ed., Portage County Historical Society, Inc., Ravenna, Ohio, 1972&#41;.
')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Portage history, 469.


Cleveland sawmill Summer and fall 1799 W. W. Williams and Major Wyatt build the first sawmill in Cuyahoga County on the falls of Mill Creek, at Newburg village (Broadway near Warner Road in Cleveland), for which they each receive a hundred acres from the Connecticut Land Company.
<i>History of Cuyahoga County, Ohio</i>, Crisfield Johnson, comp. Cleveland: D. W. Ensign & Co., 1879.
')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">History of Cuyahoga, 46.
&#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.
')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 243.

In 1795 the Connecticut Land Company investors purchased 3.3 million acres known as the Western Reserve in what became northeastern Ohio, from Connecticut. They surveyed the land, initiated infrastructure projects, and sold off parcels as townships. Moses Cleaveland was one of the investors.      1800 W. W. Williams and Major Wyatt build the county's first gristmill, next to the sawmill. William receives option to purchase 1,306 acres at a discount. Father township trustee 1802 in Cleveland's first election, William Wheeler Williams is elected one three trustees and one of two "overseers of the poor." In the same year, he sells the mill property, probably including the mill. <i>History of Cuyahoga County, Ohio</i>, Crisfield Johnson, comp. Cleveland: D. W. Ensign & Co., 1879.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">History of Cuyahoga, 46. &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 243n2; Frederick's land April 30, 1810 purchases 161 acres from his father in Cleveland township, later Warrensville Township, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 244n5. Source AFN 181103110002. Recorded Mar. 11, 1811. Book 1:46. Commodore Perry 1813 pilots Commodore Perry around the Upper Lakes Region as the Americans wrest control of the area from the British. &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 244. Marries Rebecca Swain 1815 marries Rebecca Swain of Youngstown, New York, settle near Warrensville. Frederick starts farming, studies botanical and regular medicine. &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 244–245. Brother's land sale September 6, 1817 Frederick and Rebecca; his brother and sister-in-law, W. W. and Nancy Williams Jr.; Amos and Polly Cahoon (all of Cuyahoga County), and Elijah and Martha Peets of Portage county sell the 80-square-rod lot owned by their deceased brother, Joseph, to Noble Bates for $10. The property is described as running from the mouth of the Cuyahoga River to Jedediah Rubbell's mill. Source AFN 181801060001. Recorded Jan. 6, 1818. Book 2:563. Warrensville clerk 1818, 1819, 1822 serves two terms as clerk of Warrensville Township. <i>History of Cuyahoga County, Ohio</i>, Crisfield Johnson, comp. Cleveland: D. W. Ensign & Co., 1879.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">History of Cuyahoga. 530. Living in Chardon October 23, 1828 Frederick and Rebecca, living in Chardon, Geauga county, sell Dewey B. Cook half an acre of land in Warrensville township, Cuyahoga county for $20. Source AFN 182811050003. Recorded Nov. 5, 1828. Book 7:443. Baptized, ordained November 1830 Rebecca is converted by Oliver Cowdery, Parley P. Pratt (h), Ziba Peterson, and Peter Whitmer Jr. Frederick continues to study the Book of Mormon, overcomes skepticism, is baptized and ordained an elder the same day in November. &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 245–246. Joins missionaries November 1830 agrees to accompany the missionaries for three weeks on their journey to Missouri; provides horse, cash, other provisions. In Cleveland, his parents decline baptism. &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 246. Wyandotte nation November 1830 missionaries preach to Wyandotte nation in Sandusky (Frederick had been there with Perry pursuing British and Tecumseh's Indian forces during the war). &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 246. Independence August 9, 1831 departs Independence for Kirtland with Joseph and other elders in canoes. D&C 61 Introduction Keep farm

Kirtland for 5 years
September 11, 1831 "I will not that my servant Frederick G. Williams should sell his farm, for I, the Lord, will to retain a strong hold in the land of Kirtland, for the space of five years, in the which I will not overthrow the wicked, that thereby I may save some." The farm will eventually be used for the printing house, House of the Lord, homes for Joseph, Hyrum, Sidney, and others. ¶ D&C 64:21; &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 247. Home for family October 10, 1831 the church is to provide a comfortable house for Frederick's family. Minutes of October 10, 1831 High Priesthood October 25, 1831 ordained to the High Priesthood by Oliver Cowdery. ¶ Minutes of October 25–26, 1831 Sells Warrensville land April 7, 1832 sells 141 acres in Warrensville township, Cuyahoga County to Isaac Moore of Warrensville for $1500. Cuyahoga County land records. Deed recorded Nov. 14, 1833. Book 13:89–90. Source AFN 183310090001 Recorded Nov. 14, 1833. Scribe July 20, 1832 begins work as scribe for Joseph Smith. Statement of facts relative to J. Smith & myself. Undated. Microfilm of holograph. Frederick G. Williams collection, MS 782, fd. 2, Church Archives. Revelation book  August 29, 1832 ends his work copying revelations into the Kirtland Revelations Book. Prophesies  [November 29, 1832, Joseph Smith:] this Evening Brother Frederic Prophecyed that next spring I should go to the city of PittsBurg to establish a Bishopwrick and within one year I should go to the City of New York the Lord spare the life of they servent Amen Joseph Smith diary &#40;Nov. 27, 1832&#45;Dec. 5, 1834&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 10&#45;81. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-1 in <i>Papers of Joseph Smith, Volume 1: Autobiographical and Historical Writings</i>, edited by Dean C. Jessee &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1989&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Papers, 4; <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, 1st ed., compiled and edited by Dean C. Jessee &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1984&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">JS personal, rev. ed., 21–22. Joseph's counselor [January 6, 1833 unpublished revelation:] Behold I Say unto you my Servant Frederick Listen to the word of Jesus Christ your Lord and your Redeemer thou hast desired of me to Know which would be the most worth unto you, behold blessed art tho[u] for this thing. now I say unto you my Servant Joseph is called to do a great work and hath need that he may do the work of translation for the Salvation of Souls. Verily verily I Say unto you thou art called to be a Councillor & Scribe unto my Servant Joseph Let thy farm be consecrated for bringing forth of the revelations and thou Shalt be blessed and lifted up at the Last day even so Amen Frederick G. Williams collection, MS 782, fd. 2, Church Archives // <i>Joseph Smith Revelations: Text and Commentary</i>, H. Michael Marquardt &#40;Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 1999&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">JS revelations, 231. United Firm scribe January 9, 1833 hired to serve as assistant scribe for United Firm at $300/year. Minutes of January 9, 1833 United Firm member March 15, 1833 Frederick is to be received into the United Firm. "… thou shalt be a lively member in this firm and inasmuch as you are faithful in keeping all former commandments you shall be blessed forever. Amen." D&C 92 Ordained counselor, president March 18, 1833 Joseph ordains Sidney and Frederick "to be equal with him in holding the keys of the Kingdom and also the Presidency of the High Priesthood." Minutes of March 18, 1833 Manage French farm   April 2, 1833 Kirtland council appoints Frederick to manage the French farm purchased March 23—hire men to work the brickyard and lease the rest of the property.   Minutes of April 2, 1833 Joseph's tribute   [November 19, 1833 Joseph writes in his journal:] Brother Frederick is a man who <is one of those men> in whom I place the greatest confidence and trust for I have found him ever full of love and Brotherly kindness he is not a man of many words but is ever wining because of his constant mind he shall ever have place in my heart and is ever intitled to my confiden<ce> [*] He is perfectly honest and upright, and seeks with all his heart to magnify his presidency in the church of ch[r]ist, but fails in many instances, in consequence of a lack <want> of confidence in himself: God grant that he may overcome all evil: Blessed be brother Frederick, for he shall never want a friend; and his generation after him shall flourish. The Lord hath appointed him an inheritance upon the land of Zion. Yea, and his head shall blossom. <And he shall be> as an olive branch that is bowed down with fruit: even so; Amen.   Joseph Smith diary &#40;Nov. 27, 1832&#45;Dec. 5, 1834&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 10&#45;81. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-1 in <i>Papers of Joseph Smith, Volume 2: Journal, 1832&#45;1842</i>, edited by Dean C. Jessee &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1992&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Papers, 12–13.

[*] Hand writing changes to that of Oliver Cowdery. Two pages later, Frederick's hand appears for the first time in the journal.
 Keeps Joseph's journal November [19–25], 1833 begins keeping Joseph's journal. Deeds farm 1834 deeds 142+ of his 144 acres in Geauga county to Joseph for $2200 >. Deed cited in &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 247. Prays for deliverance April 7, 1834 prays with Joseph, Oliver Cowdery, Heber C. Kimball, and Newel K. Whitney for means to deliver the firm from debt and Joseph from the prosecution of Doctor Hurlbut. Gets home, printing office April 23, 1834 receives the place where he currently lives and, with Oliver, the printing office and its contents. ¶ D&C 104:27, 29 Zion's Camp May–June 1834 Zion's Camp Note to wife at end of ¶ Joseph Smith to Emma, June 6, 1834. Discharge July 1, 1834 discharged as "council to the commander in Chief of the Army of the Lord's house, & also the duties of quartermaster & many others to which he was appointed … his garments are cl[e]ar of the blood of all with whom he has associated in this region, & he has important duties to do in the East … " Signed by Lyman Wight and Sylvester Smith. Copy in the hand of Frederick G. Williams [Jr.], Frederick G. Williams collection, LDS Church Archives, MS 782. Scripture committee September 24, 1834 selected as member of committee "to arrange the items of the doctrine" for the church with Joseph, Oliver, and Sidney. This becomes the 1835 Doctrine and Covenants. Minutes of September 24, 1834 Northern Times [June 12, 1835] Important. — We learn by the Warren News Letter that O. Cowdery has withdrawn from the editorial department of the Northern Times, a Mormon Van Buren paper published in this county, and that F. G. Williams will henceforth act as editor of that invaluable journal. It is thought that the cause of Democracy will not be endangered by this change, as the new encumbant, if he has not, like his predecessor, seen an angel, and "hefted" the golden plates, is at least a faithful follower of the Prophet, by whose inspiration the paper will doubtless still be guided in its political course.   Painesville Telegraph Source

The transfer occurred in mid-May. <i>Descriptive Bibliography of the Mormon Church, Volume One 1830&#45;1847</i>. Peter Crawley. Provo: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1997.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Crawley bibiography, 47; <i>History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter&#45;day Saints</i>, edited by B. H. Roberts, 7 vols. &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1902&#45;1912, 1932&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">HC 2:27.
Payment for clerical work September 14, 1835 a "High Council of the Presidency" decides that "the laborer is worthy of his hire." Joseph Sr. to be paid for patriarchal blessings; Frederick and Oliver for their clerical labors. Minutes of September 14, 1835 Ends as scribe January 1836 ends service as Joseph's scribe <.   &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 250n21. Sees angel (or the Savior) March 27, 1836 at the dedication of the Kirtland House of the Lord, Frederick sees an angel enter through a window and sit down between himself and Joseph Sr. The angel remains through the prayer. According to George A. Smith, Frederick "bore testimony that the Savior, dressed in his vesture without seam, came into the stand and accepted of the dedication of the house, that he saw him, and gave a description of his clothing and all things pertaining to it." ¶ Other Visions Loses election April 6, 1836 runs for overseer of the poor. Each of three candidates receive 147 votes. Lots are cast and Frederick loses. &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 249n18. Elected justice of the peace June 28, 1836 replaces Josiah Jones as justice of the peace, defeating two other candidates for the post >. (Frederick is a vocal Democrat.) &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 249n18. Namesake of Joseph's second son June 29, 1836 Joseph's and Emma's second son is born. They name him Frederick Granger Williams Smith.   Juror September 24, 1836 called to be a juror for the ensuing year. &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 249n18. Dissenter Spring 1837 included in Ebenezer Robinson's list of dissenters with Martin Harris, David Whitmer, Luke S. Johnson (h), Lyman E. Johnson (h), Parley P. Pratt (h), William E. McLellin (h), John F. Boynton (h), and Wilbur Denton. &#34;Items of Personal History of the Editor,&#34; Ebenezer Robinson in <i>The Return</i> &#40;Davis City, Iowa: Church of Christ, 1889&#45;1890&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Robinson history, 1 (Aug. 1889). First excommunication hearing May 29, 1837 Sidney accuses Frederick and David Whitmer, apostles Lyman Johnson (h) and Parley Pratt (h), and Warren Parrish of conduct "injurious to the Church of God." The council, apparently having little stomach for the purge, dissolves over procedural issues. Minutes of May 29, 1837 President, bank [Summer] 1837 appointed president of the Kirtland Safety Society with Warren Parrish as cashier. ¶ Argument to argument Counselor to Joseph September 3, 1837 sustained as a counselor to Joseph and a president of the church. Minutes of September 3, 1837 Resigns as justice of the peace September 25, 1837 resigns as justice of the peace in Kirtland <. Dropped from First Presidency November 7, 1837 dropped from the First Presidency in Far West. Signs elders licenses December 6, 1837 authorized to sign elders licenses as chairman pro tempore of the high council in the absence of President David Whitmer. Minutes of December 6, 1837 Explores northern lands December 7, 1837 added to committee of Oliver, David W. Patten (h), and Lyman Wight (h) (swh) to explore northern areas for land. Minutes of December 7, 1837 Arrested, escapes Spring 1838 on his way to Missouri, Frederick is arrested in Willoughby on a "on a frivolous and vexatious process" and sends for Luke S. Johnson for assistance. Luke, an apostle excommunicated the previous fall, helps him escape. ¶ Luke S. Johnson Death of son May 13, 1838 eldest son, nineteen-year-old Joseph, dies in Far West.   May serve mission July 8, 1838 revelation: Frederick G. Williams and W. W. Phelps have lost their standing, but may be ordained elders and serve missions abroad. Revelation of July 8, 1838 Excommunicated March 17, 1839 excommunicated in absentia with George M. Hinkle, Sampson Avard, W. W. Phelps, Thomas B. Marsh (h), John Corrill, and others. It appears they were charged with leaving the church "in the time of our perils, persecutions and dangers, and were acting against the interests of the Church." Minutes of March 17, 1839 Quincy After March 17, arrives in Quincy, Illinois, which becomes his home.   Received back April 8, 1840 (Nauvoo) requests forgiveness from the church. Hyrum presents his case to the conference. Vote to receive him back into fellowship. <i>History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter&#45;day Saints</i>, edited by B. H. Roberts, 7 vols. &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1902&#45;1912, 1932&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">HC 4:110. Death October 10, 1842 dies in Quincy of a hemorrhage of the lungs.    
Frederick's "Statement of facts relative to J. Smith & myself" Gave Joseph use of the farm for two years

Loaned oxen, tools, wagon
From the time I first became acquainted with Jos Smith I frequently assisted him let him have the run of my farm in Kirtland two year for which I recd no compensation though he frequently promised me he had given me Several notes for oxon farming utinstials waggon <& ox - [-]>, for the run of the farm I never took any note ne[i]ther reced any thing for it < Statement of facts relative to J. Smith & myself. Microfilm of holograph. Frederick G. Williams collection, MS 782, fd. 2. Church Archives.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Frederick's statement Gave money frequently Let him have money of which I mad[e] no account recollect letting him have 10 dollars at one time when making the road up the hill, also 31 dollars to redeem Kirtland currency with Surrendered all notes—no compensation for farm about the time we received the revelation [-] Page 240 if I recollect right a revelation was received regarding every one of of [sic] what was then called the firm to give up all notes & demands that they had against each other Should be given up and all be equal which we the [Cause?] that I never got any thing for my farm Page 240: of 1835 D&C 98. D&C 104 (Apr. 23, 1834) Began writing for Joseph July 20, 1831

Promised $60/year
I commenced writing for Joseph Smith Jr. July 20th 18312 as may be seen by S. Rigdons permission dated as above from which time up to the [-] of the Hebrew School in Kirtland I was constantly in Said Smiths employ and boarded myself <from which he agreed to give me 60 dollar in a year> In 1835, compensation and expenses as scribe were authorized. Minutes of September 14, 1835

In 1837 Joseph paid Frederick $200 cash for medical bills. &#34;Frederick Granger Williams of the First Presidency of the Church,&#34; Frederick G. Williams in <i>BYU Studies</i> 12, no. 3 &#40;Spring 1972&#41;: 243&#45;261.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">F. G. Williams, 252.
Gave money I also Let him have 27 dollars when he went to Missouri with the camp I also bought a patent [-] Silver watch for which [-] agreed to pay $50. … Use of farm for two years, ox, wagon, etc.

Joseph gave a note
From the time I first became acquainted with Joseph Smith Jr. Which was in the mo of August 1831, I frequently assisted him by letting him have money & other things, among which was the use of my Farm in Kirtland for two years for which I never took any note or Security I also furnished him with oxon chair Sled waggon and other things, not now recollected for which he gave me his note to the amount [of] several Hundred Dollars Then revelation revokes all debts but about the time we received the Revelation under page 240 in the doctrine and covenants a revelation was received (but not writen) requiring a certain number amoung us (among which I was one) to [-] accounts & give up all notes & demands that they had against each other & all be equal which was done this included all that he was to give me for my farm & the obligation which I held against him &c. but he never gave me any obligation for my farm whatever  
  Family Wife Rebecca Swain md. 1815 Children Lovina Susan (1816–1847) md. Burr Riggs, Nov. 19, 1834
Joseph Swain (1819–1838)
Lucy Eliza (1821)
Ezra Granger (1823–1905)

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