Mormon History 1830-1844

Edward Partridge (1793–1840)
First bishop of the Church of Christ, presided over the church in Missouri from early 1831 until the organization of a high council, July 7, 1834. The man Joseph repeatedly called "a man without guile," but who was often in trouble with the Prophet.
Born   August 27, 1793 in Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts   ¶ Ancestry.com
Died   May 27, 1840 in Nauvoo, Hancock county, Illinois  
Father   William Partridge (1753–1836)  
Edward Partridge,&#34; <i>Contributor</i> 6 no. 1 &#40;Oct. 1884&#41;:3&#45;9.
')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Whitney's Edward Partridge, 3.
Mother   Jemima Bidwell (1765–1842)  
Edward Partridge,&#34; <i>Contributor</i> 6 no. 1 &#40;Oct. 1884&#41;:3&#45;9.
')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Whitney's Edward Partridge, 3.
Hatter   [1809–1813] apprenticed four years as a hatter, then worked his trade as a journeyman in Clinton, New York before moving to Painesville, Ohio and, in 1819, marrying Lydia Clisbee.  
<i>Revelations of the Prophet Joseph Smith: A Historical and Biographical Commentary of the Doctrine and Covenants</i>, Lyndon Cook &#40;Provo: Seventy’s Mission Bookstore, 1981&#41;.
')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Revelations, 4. Universal Restorationist   A Universal Restorationist. The distinguishing feature of restorationist Universalism is the belief in a disciplinary punishment after death leading to ultimate reformation and holiness. Other Universalists believed there was no punishment after death.   B. H. Roberts footnote, <i>History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter&#45;day Saints</i>, edited by B. H. Roberts, 7 vols. &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1902&#45;1912, 1932&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">HC 1:128–129; Alexander Campbell, Millennial Harbinger 15 Extra (Dec. 1844):529–574 // "Life and Death". Campbellite   1828 baptized "reformed" Baptist preacher, Sidney Rigdon in Mentor, Ohio. Previously a Unitarian.   Civic affairs   [1829] Notice.—The householders of School District No. 6, in Painesville, are requested to meet at the Hat Store of E. Partridge on Monday the 2nd of November at 7 oclock pm for the purpose of devising ways and means for purchasing a site and erecting a School House thereon and doing other school business …   <I>Painesville Telegraph</I>')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">PT, Oct. 27, 1829. Visits Joseph   December 1830 goes with Sidney to see Joseph in New York. Investigates family reputation in Manchester, inspects farm >.     Baptized   December 11, 1830 in Seneca River by Joseph Smith Jr.   Edward Partridge,&#34; <i>Contributor</i> 6 no. 1 &#40;Oct. 1884&#41;:3&#45;9.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Whitney's Edward Partridge, 4. Elder   Ordained by Sidney Rigdon a few days after baptism.   Sidney will ordain Edward   December [7–15], 1830 revelation: sins forgiven, called to preach. "I will lay my hand upon you by the hand of my servant Sidney Rigdon, and you shall receive my Spirit, the Holy Ghost, even the Comforter, which shall teach you the peaceable things of the kingdom."   D&C 36 Mission to family   December 1830–January 1831 mission to relatives in Massachusetts.     When my father returned to New York [from Massachusetts], his parents sent his youngest brother to accompany him, they thinking him deranged and not capable of taking care of himself. But this brother, after he arrived in Painesville, received the gospel and was baptized. His name was James Harvey Partridge. They reached home about the beginning of February 1831.   Emily Dow Partridge, Reminiscence, Apr. 7, 1884. Typescript. BYU Special Collections. Bishop

No guile
  February 4, 1831 to be "appointed by the voice of the church, and ordained a bishop unto the church, to leave his merchandise and to spend all his time in the labors of the church; … And this because his heart is pure before me, for he is like unto Nathaniel of old, in whom there is no guile."   ¶ D&C 41:9–11

Date per <i>Joseph Smith Revelations: Text and Commentary</i>, H. Michael Marquardt &#40;Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 1999&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">JS revelations, 105.

Edward Partridge was "a very honest and industrious hatter, of Painesville, Ohio, who had, withal, a comfortable stock of the good things of the world. He was … always obedient, … to the revelations promulgated by Smith …" <i>Mormonism Unvailed</i>, Eber D. Howe &#40;Painesville, Ohio: author, 1834&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Mormonism unvailed, 139.
Rebuked   May 9, 1831 rebuked for interfering with elders visiting recently established churches in and around Kirtland.   D&C 50:38–39 Consecration   May 20, 1831 revelation outlines Edward's responsibilities in consecration and stewardship.   D&C 51 High Priesthood   June 3–6, 1831 attends first church conference in Kirtland. John Corrill and Isaac Morley are named to assist Edward as the bishop. The High Priesthood bestowed for the first time and the "man of sin" is revealed. Edward is ordained to the High Priesthood and blesses all others ordained.   ¶ Minutes of June [3–6], 1831

¶ Lyman Wight's Vision and the Man of Sin

To Missouri with Joseph   June 7, 1831 assigned to travel to Missouri with Joseph, Sidney Rigdon, and Oliver Cowdery.   ¶ D&C 52:24     June 19, 1831 leaves Kirtland for Missouri with Sidney Rigdon, Martin Harris, W. W. Phelps, Joseph Coe, and A. S. Gilbert and his wife. They travel by wagon, canal, and stage to Cincinnati. Then by steamer to Louisville to St. Louis. Walk to Independence.   Manuscript History of the Church &#40;December 1805&#45;August 30, 1834&#41;, 553 pages numbered from the &#34;back&#34; of Joseph&#39;s &#34;large journal&#34; &#40;A&#45;1&#41;, written June 11, 1839&#45;Aug. 24, 1843. <i>Selected Collections</i> 1:1, Volume 1 // “Joseph Smith History, 1839” &#40;first 93 pages&#41;, <i>Early Mormon Documents</i> 1:56&#45;148; “History, 1839” &#40;first 240 pages&#41;, <i>Papers of Joseph Smith 1:265&#45;386</i>. Original, Church Archives, CR 100 102, Volume 1.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">MH-A, 126.

Also dated June 18. ¶ W. W. Phelps
Angers Joseph   July 1831 in Jackson county, angers Joseph by intimating he and Oliver chose an inferior tract of land to settle near Independence.   ¶ Ezra Booth Letters (7) Rebuked   August 1, 1831 rebuked for "unbelief and blindness of heart."   D&C 58:14–15 Prevented from returning to Ohio   August 5, 1831 writes Lydia, "I have a strong desire to return to Painsville this fall, but must not. You know I stand in an important station; and as I am occasionally chastened I sometimes feel as though I must fall." Edward was directed not to return home because, according to Ezra Booth, he had offended Sydney by cautioning him about exaggerating his description of Zion.   &#34;What I Remember,&#34; Emily Dow Partridge Young. Photocopy of typed reminiscence dated April 7, 1884. Church Archives.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">I remember, 5.

¶ Ezra Booth Letters (7)
Rebuked   September 11, 1831 rebuked for having "sinned, and Satan seeketh to destroy his soul," but will be forgiven when he repents.   ¶ D&C 64 Rebuked   January 14, 1832 Hyrum Smith and Orson Hyde (h) write Edward objecting to his indirectly accusing Joseph of "seeking after monarchial power and authority."   <i>History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter&#45;day Saints</i>, edited by B. H. Roberts, 7 vols. &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1902&#45;1912, 1932&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">HC 1:317–19.

The Bishop and the Lord
Family to Independence

Lilburn Boggs
  Spring 1832 Lydia and their 6 children arrive, move into the log house room Edward had rented from future Missouri governor Lilburn W. Boggs. The cabin is on the corner of the temple lot.   &#34;What I Remember,&#34; Emily Dow Partridge Young. Photocopy of typed reminiscence dated April 7, 1884. Church Archives.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">I remember, 6. Dedicates office   May 29, 1832 dedicates the office of The Evening and the Morning Star in Independence.   Differences settled   April 26, 1832 conference in Independence, Jackson county, Joseph is sustained as president of the High Priesthood, and "All differences settled & the hearts of all run together in love." However, by July the accord had dissolved.   Minutes of April 26–27, 1832

¶ Joseph to W. W. Phelps, July 31, 1832
Crowded room   Winter 1832–1833 takes in a widow and her 4 children, making 12 or 13 living in one room.   &#34;What I Remember,&#34; Emily Dow Partridge Young. Photocopy of typed reminiscence dated April 7, 1884. Church Archives.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">I remember, 6. Criticizes Joseph   January 14, 1833 Hyrum and Orson Hyde (h) write Edward and is counselors, objecting to their "accusing Brother Joseph in rather an indirect way of seeking after monarchial power and authority."   <i>History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter&#45;day Saints</i>, edited by B. H. Roberts, 7 vols. &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1902&#45;1912, 1932&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">HC 1:318. Joseph chooses counselors   June 25, 1833 Joseph writes Edward to choose Parley P. Pratt and Titus Billings as his counselors.   <i>History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter&#45;day Saints</i>, edited by B. H. Roberts, 7 vols. &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1902&#45;1912, 1932&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">HC 1:363. Tarred   July 20, 1833 tarred and feathered with Josiah Gregg when they try to interfere with mob burning the office of The Evening and the Morning Star >.   <i>Times and Seasons</i>')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">TS 6, no. 5 (Mar. 15, 1845): 834. Offers self as ransom

Agree to leave Jackson
  July 23, 1833 Edward, John Corrill, John Whitmer, W. W. Phelps, A. S. Gilbert, and Isaac Morley meet with Jackson county citizens' committee and offer themselves as a ransom for the church "willing to be scourged or die, if that would appease their anger toward the church." Instead, the citizens agree to stop the violence and the Mormons agree to leave the county by April 1, 1834.   <i>The Evening and the Morning Star</i>')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">EMS 2, no. 15 (Dec. 1833): 114.

¶ Missouri Persecutions (2)
Head of church in Zion   September 11, 1833 acknowledged as "head of the Church in Zion … [and] Moderator in councils or conferences by virtue of his office."   ¶ Minutes of September 11, 1833 Violence   October 31, 1833 mob attacks Whitmer settlement about 8 miles from Independence, starting a season of violence.   Outrage in Jackson (1) Clay county   November, 1833 temporarily moves family into log and tent shelter on the banks of the Missouri river. Then into old log cabin (previously a stable) with John Corrill and his family in Clay county.   &#34;What I Remember,&#34; Emily Dow Partridge Young. Photocopy of typed reminiscence dated April 7, 1884. Church Archives.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">I remember, 16. Near Jackson County line   I lived more than two <near three> years <in “Clay Co> within two miles of the line of Jackson Co. and no man from Jackson <Co.> or any where else offered to bring <brought> any suit against me of any kind during the time   Partridge affidavit Named for Kirtland endowment   June 23, 1834 named in first group to receive Kirtland endowment.   ¶ Minutes of June 23, 1834     Eastern states and New England, January–October 1835.   <i>Papers of Joseph Smith, Volume 2: Journal, 1832&#45;1842</i>, edited by Dean C. Jessee &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1992&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Papers, 56n1. Leave for Kirtland   January 27, 1835 leaves Missouri for Kirtland with Thomas B. Marsh (h), arriving April 29, 1835.   Patriarchal blessing   May 4, 1835 receives patriarchal blessing.   Mission to the East   June 2, 1835 leaves on mission to eastern states and New England with Isaac Morley.   <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, 1st ed., compiled and edited by Dean C. Jessee &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1984&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">JS personal, 2nd ed., 103n70; <i>Latter Day Saints&#39; Messenger and Advocate<i>')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">MA 2, no. 2 (Nov. 1835), 221. Returns   November 5, 1835 returns from mission to the East.   <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, 1st ed., compiled and edited by Dean C. Jessee &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1984&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">JS personal, 2nd ed., 102. Sins forgiven

Remain in Kirtland
  [November 7, 1835] The word <of the Lord> came to me saying, behold I am well pleased with my servant Isaac Morley and my servant Edward Partridge, because of the integrity of their harts in laboring in my vinyard for the salvation of the souls of men, Verely I say unto you their sins are forgiven them, therefore say unto them in my name that it is my will that they should tarry for a little season and attend the school, and also the solem assembly for a wise purpose in me, even so amen   Joseph Smith diary &#40;Sept. 22, 1835&#45;Apr. 3, 1836&#41;. <i>Selected Collections</i>, 1:20 // <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, rev. ed., 221&#45;225. Original, Church Archives, MS 155.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Diary-2 in <i>Personal Writings of Joseph Smith</i>, 1st ed., compiled and edited by Dean C. Jessee &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1984&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">JS personal, 2nd ed., 102–103. Visits churches   November 10, 1835 writes he and Isaac Morley have visited 26 churches with 700 "lively members," held about 50 meetings, baptized 3.   <i>Latter Day Saints&#39; Messenger and Advocate<i>')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">MA 2, no. 2 (Nov. 1835): 221–222. School of the Prophets   Attends Hebrew class taught by Mr. Seixas with Joseph, Sidney, Oliver, W. W. Phelps, Orson Hyde (h), William E. McLellin (h) and others.  

<i>Papers of Joseph Smith, Volume 1: Autobiographical and Historical Writings</i>, edited by Dean C. Jessee &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1989&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Papers, 77. Kirtland temple dedication   March 27, 1836 attends dedication of the House of the Lord in Kirtland.   Return to Zion   April 9, 1836 leaves Kirtland for Zion with Isaac Morley, John Corrill, and W. W. Phelps.   <i>History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter&#45;day Saints</i>, edited by B. H. Roberts, 7 vols. &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1902&#45;1912, 1932&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">HC 2:436. Clay county   May 4, 1836 returns to Clay County.   Move to Far West   [October 1, 1837:] I expect to move into the village this fall, our town or City is called Far west, it contains about 100 buildings—6 stores, a post office &c. &c. Br. Wm. W. Phelps is post master. The town platt has been consecrated in part, and I have the care of it for the benefit of the church.   Edward Partridge to James Partridge, October 12, 1837, qtd. in &#34;What Crime Have I Been Guilty of?: Edward Partridge&#39;s Letter to an Estranged Sister,&#34; edited by Warren A. Jennings in <i>BYU Studies</i> 18, no. 4 &#40;Summer 1978&#41;: 520&#45;528.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">What crime, 521. Numbered with the blessed   [January 7, 1838 revelation:] Edward and his house shall be numbered with the blessed, and Abraham their father, and his name shall be had in sacred rememberance.   Revelation of January 7, 1838 Arrested at Far West   November 1838 arrested and charged with treason.   Released, to Quincy   January 1839 released from jail, joins family in Quincy, Illinois.   Advises scattering   Spring 1839 with Far West stake president William W. Marks advocates those fleeing to Illinois pay their own way, scatter out in communities. Overruled by Joseph and the Twelve.   <i>Things in Heaven and Earth: the Life and Times of Wilford Woodruff</i>, Thomas G. Alexander &#40;Salt Lake City: Signature Books&#41;, 1991, on <i>New Mormon Studies CD&#45;ROM: A Comprehensive Resource Library</i> &#40;Smith Research Associates&#41;, 1998.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Wilford's life, 82; <i>Wilford Woodruff&#39;s Journal</i>, 9 vols., compiled by Scott G. Kenney &#40;Midvale: Signature Books, 1981&#45;1984&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">WWJ 1:329 (Apr. 27, 1839). Bishop   October 5, 1839 appointed bishop of the Upper Ward in Commerce, Illinois.      


      In Waterloo     December 1830

Sidney and Edward arrive during sermon
  In early December 1830, Joseph and Emma travel to his parents' home in Waterloo. A meeting is arranged for that night in their house. While Joseph preaches, Sidney and Edward enter. After the sermon, comments are invited.   <i>Lucy&#39;s Book: A Critical Edition of Lucy Smith&#39;s Family Memoir</i>, edited by Lavina Fielding Anderson &#40;Salt Lake City: Signature Books&#41;, 2001.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Lucy, 504 // <i>Early Mormon Documents</i>, compiled and edited by Dan Vogel. 4 vols. &#40;Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Early documents, 1:444. Edward convinced by family reputation and   Mr Partridge arose and stated that he had been to Manchester in search of [damaged] s to ascertain the truth of what we preached that he had visit some of our neighbors in that place and enquired the character of the family some they said that the smith family were very [damaged] estable people and no one could say ought against them untill Joseph deceived them about [damaged] plates     Tidy farm   He had also walked over our farm and seen the neatness and order and <and industry> exhibited in everything arround he had seen what we had sacraficed for the truth's sake and yet our enemies did not dispute our veracity upon any in point but that of religion—And now said he I am ready to be baptized Brother Joseph will you baptism me—         Joseph observes that Edward is tired from his trip and suggests they wait until tomorrow.        
      Tarred and feathered in Independence (Autobiography)   Taken from home to court house

George Simpson leader

Tarred and feathered for refusing to leave
  I was taken from my house by the mob, George Simpson being their leader, who escorted me about half a mile, to the court house, on the public square in Independence; and then and there, a few rods from said court house, surrounded by hundreds of the mob, I was stripped of my hat, coat and vest, and daubed with tar from head to foot, and then had a quantity of feathers put upon me, and all this, because I would not agree to leave the county, my home where I had lived two years. <   Edward Partridge "autobiography," qtd. in <i>Times and Seasons</i>')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">TS 6 no. 4 (Mar. 1, 1845): 819. Speech before being tarred   Before tarring and feathering me, I was permitted to speak. I told them that the saints had had to suffer persecution in all ages of the world, that I had done nothing which ought to offend any one. That if they abused me, they would abuse an innocent person. That I was willing to suffer for the sake of Christ; but, to leave the country I was not then willing to consent to it.   Attitude of crowd   By this time the multitude made so much noise that I could not be heard: some were cursing and swearing, saying, call upon your Jesus &c.; others were equally noisy in trying to still the rest, that they might be enabled to hear what I was saying.   Filled with love   Until after I had spoken, I knew not what they intended to do with me, whether to kill me, to whip me, or what else I knew not. I bore my abuse with so much resignation and meekness, that it appeared to astound the multitude, who permitted me to retire in silence, many looking very solemn, their sympathies having been touched as I thought; and, as to myself, I was so filled with the spirit and love of God, that I had no hatred towards my persecutors, or any one else.      
      Tarred and Feathered (Affidavit)   Dated May 15, 1839

Original in the National Archives, qtd. in , 532, 534. Entire affidavit in <i>Mormon Redress Petitions: Documents of the 1833&#45;1838 Missouri Conflict</i>, edited by Clark V. Johnson &#40;Provo: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1992&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Redress petitions, 512–514.
July 20, 1833

George Simpson enters

50 mobbers at house, 200-300 at square
On the 20th day of July A. D. 1833 George Simpson and two other mobbers entered my house (whilst I was sitting with my wife, who was Then quite feeble my youngest child being then about three weeks old,) and compelled me to go with them. soon after leaving my house I was surrounded by about fifty mobbers who escorted me about half a mile to the public square, where I was surrounded by some two or three hundred more.   Russell Hicks: leave or else

Russell Hicks Esqr. appeared to be the head man of the mob, he told me that his word was the law of the county, and that I must agree to leave the county or suffer the consequences. I answered that if I must suffer for my religion it was no more than others had done before me — That I was not conscious of having Injured any one in the county therefore I could not consent to leave it.   Russell Hicks conducted the citizens' organizing meeting that preceded this incident. ¶ Missouri Persecutions Hicks begins to strip Edward

Others protest stripping

Tarred and feathered
  Mr. Hicks then proceeded to strip off my clothes and was disposed to strip them all off — I strongly protested against being stripped naked in the street, when some more humane than the rest interfered and I was permitted to wear my shirt and pantaloons. Tar and feathers were then brought and a man by the name of — Davies with the help of an other daubed me with tar from the crown of my head to my feet, after which feathers were thrown over me.   Sued for $50,000

Lost $800
  For this abuse I have never received any satisfaction, although I commenced a suit against some of them for $50,000 damage, and paid my lawyers six hundred dollars to carry it on, I also paid near two hundred dollars to get a change of venue. —   Lawyers double-dealing   My lawyers after getting their pay of me, made a compromise with the defendents, without my consent, and threw my case out of court without giving me any damages by their agreeing to pay the costs, which they never have paid that I know of, and I never could prevail upon my lawyers to collect them for me though they agreed so to do.
     
      Effect of Sermon on Joseph   … like apples of gold in pitchers of silver   November 29, 1835 (Sunday): went to meeting at the usal hour Elder Morley preachd and Bishop Partridge in the afternoon; their discourses were well adapted to the times in which we live, and the circumstances under which we are placed, their words were words of wisdom, like apples of gold in pitchers of silver, spoken in the simple accents of a child, yet sublime as the voice of an angels, the saints, appeared to be much pleased with the beautiful discourse these two fathers in Israel   <i>Papers of Joseph Smith, Volume 2: Journal, 1832&#45;1842</i>, edited by Dean C. Jessee &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1992&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Papers, 92.    
      W. W. Phelps on Edward Partridge   Sweet communion

Snaps of passion
  …few will be able to wear his mantle with such simple dignity. He was an honest man, and I loved him. … We lived together in peace, and our communion was sweet; although we often rebuked each other in plainness and had snaps according to passion, yet, like the used key, our friendship was bright and moistened with tears.   <i>Times and Seasons</i>')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">TS 1, no. 8 (June 1840): 120.  
    Family   Wife   Lydia Clisbee (1793–1878), md. August 22, 1819 in Painesville township, Geauga (Lake) county, Ohio.   FamilySearch™ Ancestral File v4.19 Children   Eliza Maria (1820–1886)
Harriet Pamelia (1822–1840)
Emily Dow (1824–1899)
Caroline Ely (1827–1908)
Clisbee (1829)
Lydia (1830–1875)
Edward (1833–1900)  
The Bishop and the Lord
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