Mormon History 1830-1844

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History of William E. McLellin (1806–1883)
Born 1806, William hears Mormonism in 1831 and goes to Jackson county, visits Kirtland. D&C 68. Failed to produce a revelation. Mission with Parley P. Pratt 1832–1833 but the Lord is not pleased with him. Negotiator with Missiourians 1834. Ordained apostle 1835. While on first mission of the Twelve, censures the First Presidency. Expressed no confidence in First Presidency in May 1838. Excommunicated.
This sketch is part of the series, "History of Brigham Young," published in the Millennial Star, 1863–1865. It was originally published in the Deseret News, May 12, 1858.
  HISTORY OF WILLIAM E. McLELLIN.  
<i>Millennial Star</i>
')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">MS 26, (Dec. 17, 1864): 807–809.
Born 1806 William E. McLellin was born in the State of Tennessee, supposed in 1806.  
1831 conversion He heard the gospel preached by Elders Samuel H. Smith and Reynolds Cahoon, while they were on their mission to Jackson co., Missouri, in the summer of 1831.  

Contradicted by William's journal, which states he was converted by Harvey Whitlock and David Whitmer.

<i>Journals of William E. McLellin: 1831&#45;1836</i>, edited by Jan Shipps and John W. Welch. &#40;Urbana: University of Illinois Press; Provo: BYU Studies, 1994&#41;.
')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">McLellin journals, 29–30.

Jackson county He wound up his business and followed them to Jackson co. While on the [808] way he was baptized and ordained an Elder.  
<i>Journals of William E. McLellin: 1831&#45;1836</i>, edited by Jan Shipps and John W. Welch. &#40;Urbana: University of Illinois Press; Provo: BYU Studies, 1994&#41;.
')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">McLellin journals, 33–34. Kirtland He visited Kirtland, Ohio, in the fall.     D&C 86 At his request, Joseph Smith inquired of the Lord concerning him, and received a revelation (dated Oct. 1831. Doctrine and Covenants, 3rd European edition, page 233, sec. 75.)   D&C 66   The history of Joseph Smith says that:  

 

Arrogance

Unable to write a revelation
  William E. McLellin, as the wisest man in his own estimation, having more learning than sense, endeavored to write a commandment like unto one of the least of the Lord's, but failed; it was an awful responsibility to write in the name of the Lord. The Elders and all present that witnessed this vain attempt of a man to imitate the language of Jesus Christ, renewed their faith in the truth of the commandments and revelations which the Lord had given to the Church through my instrumentality; and the Elders signified a willingness to bear testimony of their truth to all the world.   <i>Papers of Joseph Smith, Volume 1: Autobiographical and Historical Writings</i>, edited by Dean C. Jessee &#40;Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1989&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">Papers, 367–368 (Nov. 1831).

All in Favor?

D&C 67
Mission with Parley In the winter of 1832–3, he performed a mission, in company with Elder Parley P. Pratt (h), through Missouri and into Green co., Illinois, where they preached with much success.   <i>Journals of William E. McLellin: 1831&#45;1836</i>, edited by Jan Shipps and John W. Welch. &#40;Urbana: University of Illinois Press; Provo: BYU Studies, 1994&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">McLellin journals, 89–129. Also called on a mission with Luke Johnson in January 1832. D&C 75:6–11 Lord not pleased In a revelation given March 8, 1833, the Lord said, "I am not well pleased with my servant William E. McLellin."   ¶ D&C 90 Missouri negotiating committee He was one of the corresponding committee in behalf of the Saints, to confer with the Jackson and Clay County Committee, in trying to settle the Missouri difficulties.     High council 1834 July 3, 1834, he was chosen one of the high council in Clay co., Mo.,     To Kirtland and on the 9th started in company with the Prophet Joseph from Missouri to Kirtland, Ohio.     School of the Prophets He was an assistant teacher in the school of the Elders in Kirtland, during the winter of 1834–5.     Apostle He was chosen one of the Twelve Apostles, at the organization of that quorum, and appointed one of their clerks.   Ordination blessing: Minutes of Feb. 15, 1835 Debates Campbellite On the 27th and 28th of March, 1835, he held a public discussion on the divinity of the Book of Mormon, at Huntsburg, Geauga co., Ohio, with J. M. Tracy, a Campbellite preacher.       On the 29th, Joseph Smith preached at the same place, after which six were baptized.     First mission of the Twelve With the Quorum of the Twelve, in the spring of 1835, he went on a mission to the east and baptized five.   <i>Journals of William E. McLellin: 1831&#45;1836</i>, edited by Jan Shipps and John W. Welch. &#40;Urbana: University of Illinois Press; Provo: BYU Studies, 1994&#41;.')" onmouseout="kill()" target="_blank" class="ref">McLellin journals, 171–228. Censures First Presidency

Disfellowshipped
While upon this mission, he wrote a letter to Kirtland, casting censure upon the Presidency, for which he was suspended from fellowship.     Forgiven, restored September 25th, [1835] he arrived in Kirtland, and on the same day met with the Council of the First Presidency, when he confessed, was forgiven, and restored to fellowship.   Minutes of Sept. 26, 1835 Hebrew school He attended the Hebrew school in Kirtland during the winter of 1835–6, and officiated as clerk of the Twelve.     No confidence in First Presidency

He came before a Bishop's Court on Friday, May 11, 1838, where he said he had no confidence in the Presidency of the Church; consequently, he had quit praying and keeping the commandments of the Lord, and indulged himself in his sinful lusts.   May 11, 1838: minutes not in Far West Record or Kirtland Council Minutes Book. Based on hearsay It was from what he had heard that he believed the Presidency had got out of the way, and not from anything that he had seen himself.     Excommunicated He was cut off from the Church for unbelief and apostasy.     Starts own church Since he has been cut off from the Church of Jesus Christ, he has tried to establish a church of his own, that he might be the head thereof, but without success.     Robs Joseph's home He took an active part with the mob in Missouri, in robbing and driving the Saints. At the time Joseph Smith was in prison, he and others robbed Joseph's house and stable of the following property:—one roll of linen cloth, a quantity of valuable buttons, one piece of cassimere, a quantity of valuable books, a horse and gig, harness, saddle, bridle, etc.     Wants to whip Joseph While Joseph was in prison at Richmond, Mo., McLellin, who was a large and active man, went to the sheriff and asked for the privilege of flogging the Prophet. Permission was granted on condition that Joseph would fight.     Coward The sheriff made known to Joseph McLellin's earnest request, to which Joseph consented, if his irons were taken off. McLellin then refused to fight unless he could have a club, to which Joseph was perfectly willing; but the sheriff would not allow them to fight on such unequal terms.     Superficial education McLellin was a man of a superficial education, though he had a good flow of language.     Physician He adopted the profession of medicine.    
Biographies
William E. McLellin (1)




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